Fall 1976

Fall 1976

James E. Moss, Editor
Thomas L. Scharf, Assistant Editor

Original Articles

THE EXCAVATION PROGRAM AT THE SAN DIEGO PRESIDIO
By Paul Ezell
SAN DIEGO: THE SAINT AND THE CITY
By Arthur Frederick Ide
MEMORIES OF EARLY DAYS IN BAJA CALIFORNIA
By Margaret Brown Baldwin
SILENT FILM MAKING IN SAN DIEGO, 1898-1912
By Blaine P. Lamb
SOME REFLECTIONS ON CALIFORNIA, 1776
By W. Michael Mathes

Book Reviews

Black Powder and Hand Steel: Miners and Machines on the Old Western Frontier
By Otis E. Young, Jr. Reviewed by Rodman W. Paul
California, The Great Exception
By Carey McWilliams. Reviewed by Andrew Rolle
Records of a California Family: Journals and Letters of Lewis C. Gunn and Elizabeth LeBreton Gunn
Edited by Anna Lee Marston. Reviewed by Charles W. Hughes
Spudding In: Recollections of Pioneer Days in the California Oil Fields
By William Rintoul. Reviewed by Gerald White
History of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway
By Keith L. Bryant, Jr. Reviewed by Ira G. Clark
Port Los Angeles: A Phenomenon of the Railroad Era
By Ernest Marquez. Reviewed by Robert G. Athearn
A Trace of Desert Waters: The Great Basin Story
By Samuel G. Houghton. Reviewed by Lawrence B. Lee

On the Cover

cover image

OVERHEAD VIEW OF EXCAVATION AT THE SAN DIEGO PRESIDIO

The continuing work being done to learn more about San Diego's colorful past through archaeological excavation on Presidio Hill is discussed in an article in this issue of the Journal by Dr. Paul Ezell. The cover photograph shows some of the ruins with a portion of the domestic living quarters on the left and the Presidio Chapel sanctuary on the right. Dr. Ezell's article ". . . is designed, in part at least, to answer some of the questions most frequently asked by visitors to the Serra Museum and the excavations . . ."

image

THE BIPOD IN ACTION

The cover photograph was made with a camera bipod assembled from television antenna masts. The masts are held upright by the opposing pull of two support lines. Using the bipod a camera can be hoisted thirty feet into the air to take direct overhead vertical photographs. The bipod was designed and built by students in the excavation classes at San Diego State University.

Courtesy: Paul Ezell


This issue of the The Journal of San Diego History was scanned and proofread by volunteer Bill Parsons