George Allan Pendleton (1823-1871)

George Allan Pendleton (1823-1871)

Born at Bowling Green, Virginia, in 1823. He was appointed to West Point in 1842, and was there at the same time as Grant, Sherman, Stoneman, and others. Cave J. Couts was also his classmate. He was appointed first lieutenant in the Seventh Regiment. New York Volunteers, August 29, 1846. This was the famous "Stevenson Regiment." The appointment was signed by Governor Silas Wright, of New York, and bears on its back the certificate of Colonel Stevenson that Pendleton. had taken the oath. The regiment was stationed at La Paz more than a year and then came to California, seeing little active service in the Mexican War. Lieutenant Pendleton resigned and settled at Sonora, Tuolumne County, where he engaged in business. In 1849 he represented the San Joaquin district in the State Constitutional Convention. In 1855 he came to San Diego and made it his home.

In the following year he organized the San Diego Guards, was chosen captain, and remained at the head of the organization until it was disbanded, shortly before the Civil War. In 1857 he was elected county clerk and recorder (the two offices being combined in one), and continued to fill the position until his death, in 1871. He also held various other offices, being at times the only official in the county.

Captain Pendleton was a nephew of Colonel J. Bankhead Magruder and a descendant of the last British governor of Virginia. He was a man of capacity and culture. He married, first, Concepcion B. Estudillo [shown above], daughter of José Antonio Estudillo. He married, second, Clara F. Flynn, who survives him. He died March 3, 1871. His widow is now the wife of William Carson, and lives in San Diego. She relates that during the boom times, after Horton came, Mr. Pendleton would sometimes have as many as 400 or 500 deeds on hand at a time, waiting to be recorded. She was his deputy several years. His part in the conveyance of the city lands to Horton has been related. He was a steadfast friend of Old Town.

[from William Ellsworth Smythe's History of San Diego, pages 285-286]